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Alex K.
08-17-2010, 06:10 PM
Another list. Name all of the films that really left you with someone. It didn't just entertain or repulse you, but it really left an indelible impression. Perhaps it motivated you to do something different with your life, maybe take a day off work and have an existential moment, etc and etc. And most importantly they still hold up for repeat viewings.

The Passion of Joan of Arc
Throne of Blood
Cannibal Holocaust
The Virgin Spring
Salo: The 120 Days of Sodom
Black Sun: The Nanking Massacre
The Seventh Seal
I Stand Alone
Bad Lieutenant
El Topo
L'age D'or
Eraserhead
Ghost in the Shell
The Fountain

Eric R.
08-17-2010, 07:22 PM
Those are all great films! Here are two more I would add to the list:

'night Mother
Runaway Train

I've gone through many dark moments in my life with my severe TMJ jaw pain and 'night Mother, an emotional drama about suicide, really got me thinking about things and truly changed my life. I'm not to sure it's a film that has a lot of rewatchability since it is so damn downbeat, but it sure sticks with you.

Jason Lee
08-17-2010, 07:45 PM
Guinea Pig 2: Flowers of Flesh and Blood
Serbian Film
Dancer in the Dark
Men Behind The Sun
Eraserhead
Sante Sangre
Trainspotting

Jon Houghton
08-17-2010, 07:50 PM
Lion's Den--After waking to find her apartment a bloody mess, with her ex-lover Nahuel dead and her ex-lover Ramiro (Rodrigo Santoro) wounded, Julia (Martina Gusman) finds herself pregnant and in prison. Incarcerated with other mothers, she gives birth and tries to raise her son behind bars. As she continues to push for a new trial, Julia also deals with her formerly estranged mother, Sofía (Elli Medeiros), who now wants to take her son from her.

Lars and the Real Girl--When a delusional loner (Ryan Gosling) buys a life-size sex doll over the Internet, promptly falls in love with her and starts telling people that the doll is his girlfriend, his brother (Paul Schneider) and sister-in-law (Emily Mortimer) decide it's time to intervene. Patricia Clarkson co-stars in this offbeat feature film debut about love, loss and human relationships from director Craig Gillespie.

Alfred Chamberlain
08-17-2010, 08:06 PM
Countless films/moments by Cassavetes, Tarkovsky, Ozu, Chaplin, and Bresson, and Von Trier since the mid-90s. I definitely equally brace and open myself before watching their films.

Three others that occured to me right off the bat:
Safe
It's a Wonderful Life
Twenty-nine Palms
All or Nothing

Troy Howarth
08-17-2010, 09:01 PM
The Bicycle Thieves
Umberto D
Brokeback Mountain
Midnight Cowboy
The Elephant Man

These films all moved me on a deeply emotional level... I'm talking bringing tears to the eyes kind of power. Another one that always chokes me up may seem odd: Tales from the Crypt. Not the whole film, but the segment with Peter Cushing's pitiable garbage man being driven to suicide... it's obvious as all hell, but Cushing's performance is simply heart breaking.

R_Strange
08-17-2010, 09:06 PM
I watched The Elephant Man on blu recently (gorgeous transfer), and I cried like a child denied of attention. So moving, creative and beautiful. Oddly enough, it absolutely makes sense as Lynch's follow-up from Eraserhead.

Troy Howarth
08-17-2010, 09:09 PM
I'm not a Lynch fan, but I LOVE The Elephant Man... it's one of the best looking black and white films ever (Freddie Francis returned to being a DP for this one, after a less successful career as a director) and it has career best performances from Anthony Hopkins and John Hurt. I can only watch it so often, though - it's just so terribly sad, it really does tear me up every time.

R_Strange
08-17-2010, 09:17 PM
I agree. It's devastating - but I think uplifting, finally.

However, I love Lynch at his most, well, Lynch. Inland Empire, though perhaps a little on the long side, is the last film to REALLY freak me out. Like a palpable journey into subconscious - or something equally pseudo-profound ;)! His work astounds me.

Now where is that Blue Velvet blu-ray?

Jon Houghton
08-17-2010, 09:24 PM
having seen a few of Lynch's films, I have been curious to check out Elephant Man for a long time. Most reviews I have read have been bad, but I prefer the suggestions of people I respect.

Aaron G
08-17-2010, 10:01 PM
I don't particulalry find 'extreme' cienma to be emotionally powerful, I guess I'm not brutal enough...

Recent films thought that i think were emotionally POWERFUL would be CHILDREN OF MEN, Polanski's THE PIANIST, MAGNOLIA and PUNCH-DRUNK LOVE and the Dardenne Brothers ROSETTA...but while I am on AV 'MANIACS' and you all love 'brutal confronting, fucken fucked up shit to confront your emotions with' I think Cronenbergs' DEAD RINGERS and Spielberg's E.T and RAMBO:FIRST BLOOD to be incredibly emo power!

Ian Miller
08-18-2010, 01:05 AM
...but while I am on AV 'MANIACS' and you all love 'brutal confronting, fucken fucked up shit to confront your emotions with....

Nice generalization, jerk-o!:)

ANGEL A really struck a chord with me in relation to the metaphysical side of love, as did THE NINTH CONFIGURATION in its own way.

TAXI DRIVER, because even the emotionally healthiest of us have felt that type of alienation on some level at some point in our lives.

THE 36th CHAMBER OF SHAOLIN, because it continually inspires me to maintain discipline when I need it, and to inspire others by my example when they need it.

George P
08-18-2010, 01:41 AM
My additions:

Requiem For A Dream - I find it so depressing that I never watched it again.
Leaving Las Vegas - See above comment.
The Devils - I was leery but that back half is really stunning. I've seen it twice. Will watch again.
Blue Velvet

agreements:

Taxi Driver - It really resonates with me. What can I say?
El Topo - Something really happens with me when I watch this. Very engaging.

Elaborations:

I have yet finished Sante Sangre but it is very powerful from what I've seen.

g.

Alex K.
08-18-2010, 01:42 AM
I want to write all of my posts like Aaron G for a day and see where that gets me.

Ian Miller
08-18-2010, 01:57 AM
On a one-way train to Bickle-style alienation, probably!

"Listen, you screwheads!"

Randy Thomas G
08-18-2010, 03:05 AM
Loads of great choices here, including THE PASSION OF JOAN OF ARC, UMBERTO D and ROSETTA.

I'd also say TOKYO STORY (great review here recently), THE RULES OF THE GAME, THE LOWER DEPTHS (Kurosawa's version), UGETSU, SANSHO THE BALIFF, ORDET, MCCABE AND MS. MILLER.

Many of the most emotionally powerful films for me are my favourite films.

Paul Crest
08-18-2010, 03:39 AM
In Cold Blood - there's a strange scene in this film involving the Clutter girl when she chooses to not spend the night with her friend. She stops for a moment to listen to the wind? a car passing? Her facial expression is odd. She heads to the house. 1st film ever watched that truly disturbed me.

Ian Miller
08-18-2010, 04:14 AM
BONNIE AND CLYDE, for the way it forces you to identify with the leads to the point where you feel every bullet in the last scene. I know it's manipulative as all get-out, but that ending chokes me up every time.

Terry Carpenter
08-18-2010, 06:25 AM
Hana-Bi and Kikujiro. Hell...most of Kitano's films.

Akira Kurosawa's films hit this list often too. Seven Samurai, Ran, The Bad Sleep Well...

Troy Howarth
08-18-2010, 07:23 AM
having seen a few of Lynch's films, I have been curious to check out Elephant Man for a long time. Most reviews I have read have been bad, but I prefer the suggestions of people I respect.

Wow... I have literally NEVER read a bad review of The Elephant Man. I assumed it was a given that that was the one Lynch film even non-Lynch fans could get into.

Troy Howarth
08-18-2010, 07:24 AM
I'd agree with The Pianist - that definitely has some moments that choke me up.

Aaron G
08-18-2010, 08:47 AM
On a one-way train to Bickle-style alienation, probably!

"Listen, you screwheads!"

...yeah I'll sit at home and watch stuff like GUINEA PIG, SALO and TOE TAG films just to get in touch with my 'emotions'...

Actually I know you guys here are more sophisticated than the general SAW/BOB ZOMBIE loving 'brütal' type, but I personally find 'extreme' horror kinda repellent. I'll watch them for WTF curiosity and to gawk and go 'geeezzz that's fucked sheizen!', but I find alot of those films to be emotionally retarded to be ''''''''''brütally''''''''' honest. heh:p

Troy Howarth
08-18-2010, 09:15 AM
There's nothing wrong with extreme horror - look at Fulci, for example. The problem with the recent spate of films is that they're so concerned with gross out that they don't pay attention to atmosphere and suspense. In lieu of characters one can identify with, all we see are pawns being tortured in extreme ways... nothing very interesting in that. I have little use for most of the films of this type that I've seen, but I still like the first Saw.

Derek Steckler
08-18-2010, 09:31 AM
Most "tear jerkers" leave me cold. If the camera's craning into the sky and John Williams has the string section working overtime, count me out. I feel like I'm being manipulated and that takes me right out of the picture. But my favorite films have an emotional truth to them that gets under my skin. Here are some:

Frances
Last Exit to Brooklyn
Paris, Texas
Dead Ringers
Umberto D
The Elephant Man
Persona
Out of the Blue

Al Edwards
08-18-2010, 10:04 AM
In a Lonely Place
Life of Oharu
Bullet in the Head
The Wild Bunch
The Great Silence
Brazil
The Big Parade(1925)
Samurai Rebellion

Jonathan H.
08-18-2010, 10:54 AM
THE SWIMMER always hits me like a ton of bricks and even though it does have a very prominent, string-heavy score by Marvin Hamlisch it still works for me. I'm forever blown away by Lancaster's vulnerability in this role symbolized by his being naked throughout the film save for a skimpy black bathing suit.

The cinema of Mizoguchi and Ozu, SANSHO THE BAILIFF, UGETSU, LATE SPRING, and TOKYO STORY spring to mind for me.

ONCE UPON A TIME IN AMERICA with it's heartbreaking use of "Yesterday."

Haven't watched it in years, but I remember THE PAWNBROKER packing an emotional wallop.

PETULIA. "Archie?..."

When Dustin Hoffman goes off the rails in STRAIGHT TIME and we are shown the mug shots that commemorate the large chunks of his life spent in prison.

Watched SHOOT THE MOON recently and the ending really slew me, as they say.

The last shot in REPULSION.

BICYCLE THIEVES & UMBERTO D.

LA STRADA & NIGHTS OF CABIRIA.

MAKE WAY FOR TOMORROW, particularly all of the scenes of Victor Moore and Beulah Bondi's last day together.

CHILLY SCENES OF WINTER, particularly the climax.

From my childhood, and these moments still resonate: Mickey's death in ROCKY III and, from the Lester version of SUPERMAN II, the scenes where Superman reveals his identity to Lois and gives up his powers and later when he breaks off their relationship.

Thomas D.
08-18-2010, 11:26 AM
Umberto D is the first thing that comes to mind. Another one is Ponette, about a very young girl trying to cope with her mother's death.

A couple of lesser known holocaust films that fit the bill are:

Kapo (1959) - Susan Strasberg is a young Jewish girl trying to survive and eventually escape a concentration camp. I just saw this yesterday, actually, and Susan is really amazing in it, despite being dubbed.

Korczak (1990) - Andrzej Wadja's film predates Schindler's List, and is a similar but superior film imo. It's about an old man that tries to save 200 orphaned Jewish children during the holocaust.

John G.
08-18-2010, 11:35 AM
Many of the films that came immediately to mind have already been mentioned (THE ELEPHANT MAN, THE BICYCLE THIEVES in particular) but here's another one...

SON OF GODZILLA - Saw this when I was very young and I was brought to tears at Godzilla's tough love toward his son near the end. I have absolutely no clue how this would play with me today... I haven't seen it since I was 6 years old. :D

Alex K.
08-18-2010, 11:42 AM
Most "tear jerkers" leave me cold. If the camera's craning into the sky and John Williams has the string section working overtime, count me out. I feel like I'm being manipulated and that takes me right out of the picture.

I'm the same way, this is largely why Schindler's List and Passion of the Christ failed for me. Well, there's other reasons for the Passion's failure, but the manipulation of the piece was the primary reason.

Steve R
08-18-2010, 01:21 PM
Treasure of The Sierra Madre
To Kill a Mocking Bird

McCabe and Mrs. Miller
Taxi Driver
Big Wednesday

American History X
Almost Famous

The Stoning of Saroya M
Troubled Water

Daniel M
08-18-2010, 03:53 PM
It may seem an odd choice, but as an adult no film has hit me harder than Tim Burton's BIG FISH.

Pete H
08-18-2010, 04:15 PM
The Bicycle Thieves
Umberto D
Brokeback Mountain
Midnight Cowboy
The Elephant Man

These films all moved me on a deeply emotional level... I'm talking bringing tears to the eyes kind of power. Another one that always chokes me up may seem odd: Tales from the Crypt. Not the whole film, but the segment with Peter Cushing's pitiable garbage man being driven to suicide... it's obvious as all hell, but Cushing's performance is simply heart breaking.

FINALLY!!!! Someone ELSE who feels the way I do about that Tales From the Crypt segment! I start to choke up as soon as the cops are taking his dogs because he can't afford licenses for all of them...."Sergeant, PLEASE...."

Matthew BB
08-18-2010, 04:15 PM
Without getting into Bresson's own theories on how the viewer's emotional responses are supposed to work, I'll say that the motorcycle ride in DIARY OF A COUNTRY PRIEST and the scene in the country with the clothes line towards the end of L'ARGENT are very emotionally powerful to me. They're subtle, yet incredibly liberating moments and I want to be right there with the characters.

Other examples where my phony stone-cold exterior has gotten overpowered:

The end of BREAKING THE WAVES

The end of AT CLOSE RANGE

The older brother's funeral in CHINA GIRL

Many scenes in the THE DEER HUNTER (has anyone mentioned this yet? I expect some would regard it as being too over dramatic/sappy)

I'm being careful to name movies that I find to be exceptional as a whole. Slightly off-topic for a sec, I think the first time I learned that a movie could have some really overwhelming emotional moments and still be bad was with MAGNOLIA and AMERICAN HISTORY X.

Pete H
08-18-2010, 04:24 PM
POSSIBLE SPOILERS












forgive some probable paraphrasing:

Robocop: Murphy to Lewis, about his family-"I can feel them....but I can't remember them."

Children of Men: Theo to Kee, in a boat, at the end- "It's MY blood. He got me, Kee."

Gamera vs Irys: Former Deputy Inspector Osaka, regaining a purpose in life- "It's been a long time since I've had such a good saki."

Stuart Willis
08-18-2010, 05:18 PM
Breaking The Waves

The Double Life Of Veronique

The Elephant Man

The Holy Mountain (Jodorowsky's)

I Stand Alone

Combat Shock

Pan's Labyrinth

A Short Film About Killing

The Piano Teacher

Andrew Ellis
08-18-2010, 05:25 PM
I'd definitely agree about a lot of these, especially "Taxi Driver" and "The Swimmer". It depends on who you are, I guess. Not everybody relates to Travis Bickle in "Taxi Driver" like I do ("Hardcore" is also powerful). I just saw "The Swimmer". That is really powerful and it's amazing how it goes from joyful to tragic over the course of the movie. "Seconds" is very similar to that.

Nobody's mentioned "The Virgin Suicides". That's very powerful, especially if you grew up in the 70's. "The Ice Storm" which is also about the 70's or "Picnic at Hanging Rock", which has a very similar them to "Suicides", are also pretty potent.

And even though it's a comedy, I find "Ghost World" pretty touching. I could really relate to Thora Birch's character from when I was 18 and Steve Buscemi's at the age I am now. "Rushmore" was like that too. Some others off the top of my head are "The Slaughter Rule", "The Sailor Who Fell from Grace with the Sea", "My Own Private Idaho", and "The Last Picture Show".

Derek Steckler
08-18-2010, 05:52 PM
Breaking the Waves is a good one, very powerful and emotional with great perforances... but at the back of my mind I always have the sneaking suspicion Von Trier is just fucking with me. That keeps me from engaging 100%, though I get damn close.
Actually nowadays any film with Katrin Cartlidge affects me, she was so good and died way too early. She's fantastic in Mike Leigh's NAKED, which is powerful in a different way.

Jonathan H.
08-18-2010, 05:57 PM
The end of AT CLOSE RANGE


Oh yeah...forgot about that one. Penn is shattering in that moment on the stand. Gets me every time.

Cimino's DEER HUNTER isn't my favorite, but I am a sucker for the use of "Can't Take My Eyes Off You," one of my all-time favorite "emotionally powerful" tunes.

I will add Cimino's THUNDERBOLT AND LIGHTFOOT (my favorite Cimino)...the ending in this film, with that great Paul Williams tune in the background, is wonderfully moving, in part, because it's not hitting you over the head with its emotional power, which is part of the reason the '70s were so great. No cheap sentimentality in those days, for the most part!

Jonathan H.
08-18-2010, 06:00 PM
Breaking the Waves is a good one, very powerful and emotional with great perforances... but at the back of my mind I always have the sneaking suspicion Von Trier is just fucking with me. That keeps me from engaging 100%, though I get damn close.
Actually nowadays any film with Katrin Cartlidge affects me, she was so good and died way too early. She's fantastic in Mike Leigh's NAKED, which is powerful in a different way.

Ditto on Cartlidge. Also love her in CAREER GIRLS. Another film with some emotionally powerful scenes that have stayed with me since I saw it on release in the '90s. Haven't seen it since...

Aaron G
08-18-2010, 06:25 PM
Breaking the Waves is a good one, very powerful and emotional with great perforances... but at the back of my mind I always have the sneaking suspicion Von Trier is just fucking with me. That keeps me from engaging 100%, though I get damn close.


Yeah I agree with you 100% regarding VonTrier, but interestingly I feel his films have a wee bit more pulsing blood in them than say Michael Haneke, who I also like despite his 'extremity and BRütalness!'

Aaron G
08-18-2010, 06:28 PM
There's nothing wrong with extreme horror - look at Fulci, for example. The problem with the recent spate of films is that they're so concerned with gross out that they don't pay attention to atmosphere and suspense. In lieu of characters one can identify with, all we see are pawns being tortured in extreme ways... nothing very interesting in that. I have little use for most of the films of this type that I've seen, but I still like the first Saw.

I hear ya, but I don't find Fulci films 'emotionally powerful', and Fulci's horror is of a macabre spiritual variety, especially if you go to Europe and see all this fucked up Catholic imagery in the churches and mausaleums there, it makes perfect sense..

Vincent Pereira
08-18-2010, 09:05 PM
Agree with many already mentioned (BREAKING THE WAVES, DANCER IN THE DARK, REQUIEM FOR A DREAM, THE ELEPHENT MAN, THE DEER HUNTER...).

A few recent ones not mentioned yet- MYSTERIOUS SKIN, 12 AND HOLDING, BUG, and HUNGER come to mind. I'd also argue that lots of Cronenberg's films would count, too- in particular THE DEAD ZONE and THE FLY come to mind.

Vincent

Terry Carpenter
08-18-2010, 09:48 PM
I'd add Battle Royale to this list also. Specifically the kids meeting with Kitano at the end.

Jason N
08-18-2010, 10:32 PM
Sick: The Life and Death of Bob Flanagan moved me in a way few films have.

Randy Thomas G
08-19-2010, 01:32 AM
I'd say THE PIANO TEACHER and THE WHITE RIBBON are the most emotionally effective films by Haneke for me. The ending of THE PIANO TEACHER is like a punch in the gut.

MYSTERIOUS SKIN is a very good call as well.

Guillaume P
08-19-2010, 02:40 PM
Waking the dead (a film about love,loss,breakdown that really moved me!)
White Dog (Fuller)
Tchao pantin (Berri)
Full Circle/The Haunting of Julia (Loncraine)
At close range (Foley)
One flew over cuckoo's nest (Forman)
Dead poets society (Weir)
The thin red line (Malick)
Casualties of war (De Palma)
Bubba ho tep (Coscarelli)
Phantasm (Coscarelli)
The insider (Mann)
The straight story (Lynch)
Somewhere in time (Swarc)
The Shawshank redemption (Darabont)
The indian runner (Penn)
Crossing guard (Penn)
Once upon a time in America (Leone)
The dead zone (Cronenberg)
Heavy (Mangold)
Birdy (Parker)
House of sand and fog (Perelman)
Ali (Mann)
Manhunter (Mann)
Elephant man (Lynch)
Mysterious skin (Araki)
Breezy (Eastwood)
Honkytonk Mann (Eastwood)

Guillaume P
08-19-2010, 02:44 PM
RAMBO:FIRST BLOOD to be incredibly emo power!

Sly's monologue at the end shows you how a good actor and screenwriter he can be,i also add the first ROCKY to this list!:)


Requiem For A Dream - I find it so depressing that I never watched it again.

A very effective film to experience on the big screen!
I still remember my screening...the audience was quiet or in tears during the end titles...Ellen Burstyn's monolgue halfway the film...and the last scene with Ellen Burstyn...wow.



Oh yeah...forgot about that one. Penn is shattering in that moment on the stand. Gets me every time.

the same!...incredible scene,so well acted,tense and shattering!



I'd also argue that lots of Cronenberg's films would count, too- in particular THE DEAD ZONEcome to mind.

I like the scenes between Walken and Brooke Adams...very bitter...and the ending,of course.

Matthew BB
08-19-2010, 05:56 PM
The straight story (Lynch)

A good friend of mine urged me to see this. He told me that it flat out brought tears to his eyes. I"ll admit, I was intrigued by that. Funnily enough, I've recently seen at least a couple of members on here call it pretty terrible. I'll give it a look eventually, but there is something about it that has held me off all of these years. The idea of Lynch and a G-rating, perhaps?

Of course, I'm kidding. Like many in this thread, I have a deep appreciation for THE ELEPHANT MAN, and that doesn't have any nightmarish depravity in the slightest.

Troy Howarth
08-19-2010, 06:31 PM
Good call on House of Sand and Fog and One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest....

Vincent Pereira
08-19-2010, 11:36 PM
A good friend of mine urged me to see this. He told me that it flat out brought tears to his eyes. I"ll admit, I was intrigued by that. Funnily enough, I've recently seen at least a couple of members on here call it pretty terrible...

People here said THE STRAIGHT STORY is terrible???!?!?? I'm literally blown away by that. It's one of my favorite films of the 1990s, just a beautiful piece of work.

Vincent

Lars Andersen
08-19-2010, 11:59 PM
Synecdoche, New York
Adaptation
Mysterious Skin
Murnau's Faust
Assassination of Jessy James By the Coward Ford
Der Todesking
The Hours
The Devil's Eye
The Seventh Continent
Donnie Darko
Irreversible

Matthew BB
08-20-2010, 12:14 AM
People here said THE STRAIGHT STORY is terrible???!?!?? I'm literally blown away by that. It's one of my favorite films of the 1990s, just a beautiful piece of work.

Vincent

I guess now I'll have to see it sooner than I was expecting. I've heard many say that it's wonderful. And I've heard a few harsh criticisms, I forget where on here, it was definitely an older thread that I looked at not that long ago. Maybe those with the negative views will come forward :D.

Randy Thomas G
08-20-2010, 12:42 AM
I'm not a fan of THE STRAIGHT STORY, but I wouldn't say it was terrible.

Garrett Sorensen
08-20-2010, 12:43 AM
I am going to try and avoid the obvious war movies that play on our heart strings (ala Schindler's List)

One Night Stand (1984)
Submission
Synechdoche, New York
The Fountain (depressed me big time)
Paperhouse
Little Children
Requiem for a Dream
The Woodsman
The Elephant Man
Harold and Maude
Leaving Las Vegas
Trainspotting

Patrick B.
08-20-2010, 01:23 AM
Brokeback Mountain
The Color Purple
The Elephant Man

My girlfriend and I saw Brokeback Mountain, The Color Purple and Control in 1 day. We where fucking wrecks. Not that Control is a very emotional movie, it's just sad, and that was enough for us after two incredible emotional viewings.

There are more. But I can't remember them. Fakk.

Vincent Pereira
08-20-2010, 01:48 AM
I'm not a fan of THE STRAIGHT STORY, but I wouldn't say it was terrible.

Not trying to start a fight here or anything, but what do you think is wrong with it? It honestly is, IMO, a near perfect film, so I'm honestly curious as to what its detractors find wrong with it.

Vincent

Derrick King
08-20-2010, 02:10 AM
Au revoir les enfants
Grave of the Fireflies
Ikiru

Clive Smith
08-20-2010, 07:21 AM
Yeah, GRAVE OF THE FIREFLIES is a brute. I was sad.

COME AND SEE
IRREVERSIBLE
IT"S A WONDERFUL LIFE
THE PASSION OF JOAN OF ARC

Troy Howarth
08-20-2010, 07:24 AM
People here said THE STRAIGHT STORY is terrible???!?!?? I'm literally blown away by that. It's one of my favorite films of the 1990s, just a beautiful piece of work.

Vincent

There are some who just love to go against the grain and dislike anything that's well liked... It's not just here, it's pretty much anywhere you go.

Troy Howarth
08-20-2010, 07:25 AM
I'm not a fan of THE STRAIGHT STORY, but I wouldn't say it was terrible.

Just to clarify: I'm not saying you or anybody else are wrong to dislike it. :)

Blake L.
08-20-2010, 11:53 AM
The climax of The Iron Giant had me all teary.

Garrett Sorensen
08-20-2010, 01:04 PM
The climax of The Iron Giant had me all teary.

Yeah, I'm a fucking sucker for the mumbled "superman" line at the end. Kind of speaks to anyone who has been trained one way but wants to be something better.

Gotta add Last American Virgin to my list and OHMSS. Both take surprising detours for their genre and are more affecting for it.

Also Roger Corman's The Intruder. Buster & Billie.

---------------------

I can't believe I forgot about the dogma 95 film Festen (aka The Celebration.) That one killed me, then again almost anything on that subject does.

Jonathan H.
08-20-2010, 01:35 PM
Yeah, I'm a fucking sucker for the mumbled "superman" line at the end. Kind of speaks to anyone who has been trained one way but wants to be something better.

Gotta add Last American Virgin to my list and OHMSS. Both take surprising detours for their genre and are more affecting for it.

Also Roger Corman's The Intruder.

Was just thinking of the great kick-in-the-nuts finale of LAST AMERICAN VIRGIN when "Just Once" came up on my shuffle running this morning.

Matthew BB
08-20-2010, 06:17 PM
Was just thinking of the great kick-in-the-nuts finale of LAST AMERICAN VIRGIN when "Just Once" came up on my shuffle running this morning.

"Kick-in-the nuts"

That's perfect wording for how that movie's ending feels. Seeing it on television when I was about to enter my teens...it just seemed so sad and wrong. I know many who have said the same.

Matthew BB
08-20-2010, 06:23 PM
I could go on forever with this, but I thought of (hopefully) just one more. I'm not a big Aronofsky fan and a couple of his films have been mentioned, but I'm quite sure that THE WRESTLER hasn't. That film and I guess even what it represented for Rourke moved me tremendously.

Darcy Parker
08-20-2010, 08:48 PM
I would say the movies that hit me the hardest were as follows, in no particular order:

The Wrestler
Unforgiven
Gran Torino
Falling Down "You mean I'M the bad guy?"
Blade Runner (Batty's speech as she prepares to die)
Monsters, Inc.
Cool Hand Luke
True Romance
The Dark Knight (Laugh if you want, but the themes and questions it raises get me)
Man on Fire

Andy Bensini
08-20-2010, 09:02 PM
Once Upon A Time In America - There's like ten scenes that draw a man tear or two out of me.

The Wrestler - His teary speech to his daughter and subsequent fuckups.

Boys Don't Cry - Just wall to wall unpleasantness.

Bastard Out Of Carolina - Vicious child abuse followed by the most graphic child rape scene ever filmed. Horrifying and it just left me frozen in shock.

Steve R
08-20-2010, 10:44 PM
Garrett,

"Buster & Billie"

I'm with you on that one.

Steve

Steve R
08-20-2010, 10:50 PM
No Greater Glory
1934 film by Frank Borzage about street kids fighting over turf.
They play war games. One kid that is shunned goes through everything he can so he will be liked and accepted by his neighborhood's gang.
I saw this when I was maybe eight and it just devestated me.

Randy Thomas G
08-21-2010, 03:34 AM
The climax of The Iron Giant had me all teary.

Ditto.
:o

Randy Thomas G
08-21-2010, 03:36 AM
Not trying to start a fight here or anything, but what do you think is wrong with it? It honestly is, IMO, a near perfect film, so I'm honestly curious as to what its detractors find wrong with it.

Vincent

I'm not a fan of Lynch in many ways, I think beneath the surface surrealism he's rather more conventional and moralistic than many think. The Straight Story is fine for what it is, but I don't really care for what it is. It feels a little mannered and faux-folksy, for the kinder and gentler Lynch I much prefer The Elephant Man.

Vincent Pereira
08-21-2010, 08:07 PM
Gottcha R.T., although I disagree I can appreciate where you're coming from.

Vincent