PDA

View Full Version : Who killed the Special Edition DVD?



Wyatt Doyle
07-16-2010, 08:33 PM
Matt Kennedy (of Panik House, Blue Underground, etc.) writes a very hip column for the Forces of Geek website called Exploiting the Media, and his latest post, "The Clean-Up," is really something.

As I said elsewhere about it, those wondering what happened to the "special" in "special edition" DVDs, here's your answer.

http://www.forcesofgeek.com/2010/07/clean-up.html

Troy Howarth
07-16-2010, 08:53 PM
As soon as it became common practice for every new release to get a SE, it took away the "special" quality of it. Sure, every film deserves the best release for those who care about it... but I do think the allure is missing.

BrianS
07-16-2010, 09:21 PM
Great article! Thanks.
Interesting read.
I miss those days when genre labels thrived.

David Huber
07-16-2010, 09:53 PM
Very interesting article. And whatever else started the decline of the Special Edition dvd, Blu-Ray killed it. I still haven't made the leap and I doubt if I will.

Dick Ringeisen
07-16-2010, 11:21 PM
Very interesting article. And whatever else started the decline of the Special Edition dvd, Blu-Ray killed it. I still haven't made the leap and I doubt if I will.

I skimmed through the article, Didn't read every word, but I get the gist of it. Basically, and I've seen this for a while, things are saturated, this wave is done. It's been dying for a while. Time for new stuff; Blu-ray, 3-D, downloads, etc....

Also, about extra stuff on Blu-ray. It doesn't sell me on Blu-ray, and also not on DVD. Maybe I am in a minority, but I prefer the movie to the extras. I want the movie, best presentation on the media as possible, un-edited also. Blu-ray preferably.

David, some people will skip Blu-ray all together, and wait for digital downloads, or a "cloud" based rental/purchase service. I doubt DVD will be around for 10 more years, so eventually it's going to be a new form of physcial media, or online media for those who are still with only DVD. If a person's SDTV is still alive, don;t have the room for something larger, don't like the idea of BD, their DVD player still works fine and don't want a BD player, they're happy with what they have, etc... they can enjoy theirself, there i plenty, and still being plenty made for DVD. Just keep in mind, it won't always be the same as it is now. I'm still enjoying my calibrated 1080i televisions. They look great to me, still, years later. I'll upgrade again when one takes a shit or is 10+ years old. I understood when I bought it, it was engineered obsolescence (there is 480P but no 1080P???).

Myself, for the most part, I don't give a shit about the "Special Edition" DVD or Blu-ray. What I care about the most, is the movie, uncut if possible, in the best presentation possible. Throw in an interview if you like, but I'm not buying it for the interview. I can probably read the same stuff elsewhere. Maybe, sell the extra shit as something extra, direct through the company. THEN, it REALLY becomes special! As long as it's not burnt onto a DVD-R :) Even if on DVD-R, make the "geeks" feel like they have something super special. If thy love the movie so much, they can buy direct from the company an extra special features, BURNT TO ORDER, limited edition to 1,000 copies or until 3 months past release date, special edition interviews, documentary, whatever DVD/BD. That I can consider special. You could have some stuff realy special, maybe for certain films only 100 people (OR LESS!) will buy that extra special features DVD/BD!

I also hate special cases, I don;t want a coffin shaped DVD case, or something in a steel case, etc. I just want the damn movie. If people want a special edition packed with extras, make a truly special edition, then all the people who want that stuff can buy it. Direct from the company! That way the company keeps more money...

My Bloody Valentine 1981, for example... . I don't care about any additional interviews and such on the Blu-ray (And also new DVD...), I bought the BD to see the movie uncut, in great picture quality. I doubt I ever watched anything extra on that release, if there was even anything extra on there! I don't know! The reason i bought it was for the movie. I saw the uncut movie, that's what I bought it for.

I bought into so much DVD because it was digital, it would not degrade. I understood something better would be out there eventually, but, DVD looked decent enough I felt OK building a library for the future, since it was digital, it could be transferred, mirror image, elsewhere. Also, I had a good discount for a while... . I know DVD's can rot, etc, etc, BUT, I can create perfect copies of what I own on DVD onto a Hard drive! That was a big part of getting consumed with DVD, regardless of knowing something better woudl eventually be out there. Also, they were much cheaper than LD's.

I already have a decent library, it takes something more to sell me now. I have most of what I want. I would be extremely happy if I could buy ONLY a DVD or Blu-ray, minus the case. Toss it in a cardboard sleeve..... Most of the time, I only want the movie.

.

.

Troy Howarth
07-16-2010, 11:24 PM
I don't think it's the extra material available on BR that's a selling point - it's the improved quality. I resisted it for a while, too, but I'm happy I made the plunge...

David Huber
07-16-2010, 11:47 PM
I don't think it's the extra material available on BR that's a selling point - it's the improved quality. I resisted it for a while, too, but I'm happy I made the plunge...

I don't think it's the extra material per se, it's just the concept of Blu-Ray in the first place combined with economics. More $$ to BR = less $$ to DVD. More shelf space to BR = less shelf space to DVD. More studio attention to BR catalog titles = less attention to DVD. It's planned obsolescence, but the timing was too soon. I think the studios got greedy at a time when the buying public wanted to scale back. But all I can think of is that if BR didn't exist, would we still be getting cult titles with all the bells and whistles released at the same pace as before (not to discount the great work that companies like Shout and Synapse and Code Red are still putting forth)? There would be more $$ for the studios to put into finding product that hadn't hit the marketplace before instead of throwing all their $$ at marketing a new format.

Dick Ringeisen
07-16-2010, 11:56 PM
I don't think it's the extra material per se, it's just the concept of Blu-Ray in the first place combined with economics. More $$ to BR = less $$ to DVD. More shelf space to BR = less shelf space to DVD. More studio attention to BR catalog titles = less attention to DVD. It's planned obsolescence, but the timing was too soon. I think the studios got greedy at a time when the buying public wanted to scale back. But all I can think of is that if BR didn't exist, would we still be getting cult titles with all the bells and whistles released at the same pace as before (not to discount the great work that companies like Shout and Synapse and Code Red are still putting forth)? There would be more $$ for the studios to put into finding product that hadn't hit the marketplace before instead of throwing all their $$ at marketing a new format.

That's capitalism for ya. i think 3-D Blu-ray is a bit early, but, if I can downgrade a 3-D BD to "normal" Blu-ray, just as I can do with BD to a SDTV, fuckit, I'll buy/rent it if I don't have a 3-D HDTV and it's a title I'm interested enough in.

I love this rollercoaster of sorts, technology advancing. It's awesome...Most of the time :) How far will it go in your lifetime? What will be out there after you take the permanent sleep?

.

Jason S
07-17-2010, 02:07 AM
The article was a good read about the demise of niche special editions. It was a golden age for "cult" dvd titles when everything aligned and stuff like the Mondo and Pinky Violence boxsets were possible. Dvd hit at the perfect time for people who grew up in the '70s and '80s.

One thing that I think really plays into this scenario is age. Maybe I'm totally off, but the demographics for these niche titles must be waning as we age. How many of us have had to curb this hobby and deal with "life" in general? How many have just lost interest in it and moved onto new pastimes? How many people 25 and under are interested in these types of films? How many would really care to watch documentaries/extras about films that are 30+ years old? There will always be young and curious film buffs, but as cinema ages as a medium, along with the mind boggling availability, there's a lot more for a young person to choose from. Interest in these niche genres will cool and fall by wayside, regardless of the video format.

Alex K.
07-17-2010, 02:30 AM
I think horror on DVD will forever be a semi-thriving market. Horror fans are guilty of looking to the past to find the hidden gems. Just think of all the Tweens who watched Scream and thought "I wonder if there's any better slashers?" and stumble upon Pieces, New York Ripper, My Bloody Valentine, and etc.

I can't see the more obscure stuff lasting on DVD for very much longer. I suspect everything will go the Download route, and DVD's being strictly limited editions.

Fred Anderson
07-17-2010, 02:41 AM
It's expensive to produce and their dvds only end up on Cinemageddon for free. So why spend more money on a release?

Jason S
07-17-2010, 02:52 AM
I think horror on DVD will forever be a semi-thriving market. Horror fans are guilty of looking to the past to find the hidden gems. Just think of all the Tweens who watched Scream and thought "I wonder if there's any better slashers?" and stumble upon Pieces, New York Ripper, My Bloody Valentine, and etc.

I can't see the more obscure stuff lasting on DVD for very much longer. I suspect everything will go the Download route, and DVD's being strictly limited editions.


In the late '90s I could see Tweens being turned onto '80s slashers because of Scream. Tweens now are watching Twilight and remakes. And I don't see them watching the originals unless their dad owns the dvd.

Gary Banks
07-17-2010, 08:11 PM
It is rare these days for me to listen to a commentary or be impressed enough by extras to make a purchase based on them. That being said I've just about busted a nut waiting for Forbidden World and Galaxy Of Terror. :D

Bill Piper
07-17-2010, 10:12 PM
That article was a great read! Thanks for posting it.

Looking at the marketplace now, I don't hardly see any genre titles I'm interested in, which has caused me to grab very very few discs (DVD & blu). DVD definitely hit its peak years ago. However, like Gary mentioned, I'm extremely excited for the Corman blu-rays to hit the market place.

Daniel S.S.
07-17-2010, 10:27 PM
I stopped buying 2-disc special editions when I realized I never, seriously, never even popped the second disc in the player. I no doubt missed out on some interesting stuff but as I mentioned elsewhere, my situation is such that it's a struggle to get the time to watch a movie as it is.

Jon Houghton
07-18-2010, 03:13 AM
that is one of the reasons I love SWV so much, is because when they released "special editions", they weren't kidding. lots of trailers, 5 or 6 shorts, or sometimes a "bonus feature" that is a full movie, and of course their never ending supply of "sexploitation radio spots and posters" thing they always do at the end. even their dvd-r's usually have at least a few trailers too.

Mattias Karlsson
07-18-2010, 06:38 AM
I don't really care about extras, I just want the movie in the best shape possible.

Fred Anderson
07-18-2010, 07:47 AM
Yeah, I agree with Mattias. In some special cases (like with City of the Living Dead) it's fun, but for the most of time it's not important to me. The movie itself is number 1.

Grant W
07-18-2010, 08:47 AM
I've got that many films stacked up to watch now if I started watching extras I'd never get through them. Just release a decent copy of the film Goddammit!

Bob Andrews
07-18-2010, 10:45 AM
For me it depends... first of all lots of so-called SEs really weren't that special... filled with featurettes, some deleted scenes (mostly they are deleted for a reason :D ), promo material... sadly it's rare to see some good making ofs or documentaries like those for TAXI DRIVER or JAWS... second, SE also meant a much higher price... only my favorite films I bought as SEs about all other movies I am interested in I always pick the standard dvd.

Steve R
07-18-2010, 11:51 AM
I am in it for the movie in the best possible pq, correct ar, and with the best sound. I'd trade 98% of those "extras" for a good DTS track anyday. Most extras, particuarly for current fare make no impression on me and I never look at them. The few exceptions were the "Bullet time" one in the Matrix that was a truly inventive bit of filmmaking and the Kevin Smith ones as they are unabashedly only there for fun.

The only "special editions" that make any sense to me to do in the first place are those for films that you have some critical distance from. Generally 20 years or more. The documentaries on directors that encompass their whole careers make a great companion to box sets. Actors, too. The TCM docs are great. Those Universal horror classic sets have excellent ones. It seems to be successful less often in single titles. Maybe not. Taxi Driver stands out large. Carpenter's The Thing. Psycho is beyond excellent. I'll always listen to more Peckinpah stories, too. IIRC, the new Rodan had a great doc on the Toho spfx team. I like the short ones in the WB Noirs sets, though could do without seeing all the film clips from the picture I've just seen. Some of the early Bond ones were pretty cool, too.

I also find many of them to be very poorly made and ill thought out. Talking heads in reclining chairs cut up into little sound bites. Rarely do you get any depth. Too many have that shallow ET style and even if they try to be hip, the knowledge base falls far short of what many dedicated fans already know.

By and large I think extras are created to "add value" to a film and give the studios an excuse to add that second disc in a spiffier package for more money. Nothing wrong with making more money at all. Go for it. But for my taste they hold no interest at all. I never liked commnetaries, much prefer a well organized doc that puts the film in an historic context and gives me some insight, essentailly enhancing one's appreciation of the story and how it was told.

In a word, real special editions are just that special. Most aren't, by a long country mile.

Marshall Crist
07-18-2010, 01:37 PM
Excellent presentation of the film itself should be a given.

I miss extras. Some were lame but many were great.

John W..
07-18-2010, 02:13 PM
I'm not sure it's asking too much to have both a pristine copy of the film and a healthy selection of extras - I always appreciate both. Often a good commentary or docu enhances my appreciation or understanding of the picture.
Also, as more and more of our favourites pass away, it's nice to have a permanent record of their thoughts on their own work. I'm thinking of David Warbeck's commentary on 'The Beyond' or anything with Joe Sarno - (the list could go on and on.)

Maybe I'm greedy, but I want it all.

John K
07-18-2010, 04:49 PM
Very interesting article. It's surprising to realize that most everything has a "golden age." You'd think something like extras would have been timeless...

Like pretty much everyone, I think, I'm kinda worn out on extras, and that's part of the problem too. When DVD first came out, everything was so fresh and new. Every extra was a little informational gift from heaven, and I sifted through them all patiently and happily. It was just so novel and exciting, and DVD was new enough, and the market not flooded enough, that doing so seemed and realistic and achievable endeavor. But as more and more films started coming out, just keeping up with what I wanted to watch was becoming a challenge, not to mention sifting through several commentaries and an hour's worth of featurettes.

That said, I still like special features, I'm just more discerning with what I watch. Generally, pretty much any studio DVD is just movie-only for me at this point. I don't need a bunch of EPK bullshit where everyone gushes over how great everyone else was and doesn't really say anything at all. With smaller stuff it's different, though - indies, documentaries, old releases of cult titles. In these, people are usually more honest in the featurettes and commentaries, talking about what worked and what didn't, where there was conflict, and seriously getting into the process of filmmaking itself from time to time. There's really a lot you can learn sifting through some of this stuff, if you're so inclined. But I do have a lot less patience these days - generally I can tell within about 5 minutes whether a commentary will be worth listening to (if the participants are too reserved, not saying anything substantative, etc., etc.) ; and if a featurette isn't interesting me, I have no qualms now about just shutting it off and forgetting it forever. But I do still try to at least give most stuff I think I might be interested in a try. A lot of times there's some cool stuff in there, particularly if you stumble onto one of those lovingly produced early 00s featurettes or something.

So yeah, I think Matt's right that the economics of it really stopped such exciting features from being produced now as they used to be. However, I think general apathy is part of the picture, too. People presenting you with bowl upon bowl of ice cream seems like a pretty good deal at first, but after a while, you kind of have to start becoming pickier.

Daniel S.S.
07-18-2010, 05:54 PM
The extras that I have generally gotten the most enjoyment from are the ones with legitimate, behind the scenes photos from the filming, often in B&W. Dracula vs. Frankenstein has the priceless photo of Lon Chaney Jr. cuddling the puppy and Bloody Judge has an adorable photo of Maria Rohm blowing a bubble with her gum while in period costume. I love stuff like that. It's quick and it's satisfying. Sitting through the talking heads in reclining chairs as Steve put it tends to be more of a chore and therefore ceased being a purchasing incentive.

Luis Domenech
07-19-2010, 04:39 PM
A true Special Edition, to me, is when a studio comes in and restores a film to its original length, as was the case with several titles like The Big Red One, The Wild Bunch and Alien 3. Couple that with restrospectives on the film (not EPKs, I'm talkin about full-length docs) and you've got a special edition. Collector's Editions that include both original and remake versions of films (Ben-Hur, for example) are definitive enough for me. I'm not too fond of commentaries (except for some obscure horror flicks) but when they do those "virtual" ones with a long deceased actor I may listen to a portion of it out of curiosity). I agree with most posters that what truly counts is a completely uncut film, looking as best as possible.

Ian Z.
07-19-2010, 05:34 PM
It is rare these days for me to listen to a commentary or be impressed enough by extras to make a purchase based on them. That being said I've just about busted a nut waiting for Forbidden World and Galaxy Of Terror. :D

Yeah, there are some discs that I go ga-ga over a special edition of, but I recently stopped bothering to listen to commentaries and such for films I don't particularly love. I personally think it's market saturation -- there are just TOO many films out there for me to buy or rent that I can't afford to spend all that extra time on commentaries and extras for movies that aren't my absolute favorites. At this point, if I listened to every commentary track I own alone, I'd probably die before I had time to watch the corresponding movies.

John K
07-19-2010, 07:33 PM
The extras that I have generally gotten the most enjoyment from are the ones with legitimate, behind the scenes photos from the filming, often in B&W. Dracula vs. Frankenstein has the priceless photo of Lon Chaney Jr. cuddling the puppy and Bloody Judge has an adorable photo of Maria Rohm blowing a bubble with her gum while in period costume. I love stuff like that. It's quick and it's satisfying. Sitting through the talking heads in reclining chairs as Steve put it tends to be more of a chore and therefore ceased being a purchasing incentive.

Photo galleries are actually some of my least favorite extras. Usually they're just 12 different screencaps set to music. Why did you even bother? So the "extras" section on the back of the DVD looks fuller? These are the same companies who pad this section out with things like "chapter stops" (oh yeah, woooo!), "English audio" (or whatever language...but if there's only one, the fact that it's there is not a special feature...it's part of the fucking movie), etc.

Now, that's not what you're talking about, obviously. I agree that original behind-the-scenes stills from old movies are kinda cool, as are pressbooks, etc. But a little of that goes a long way for me - a few minutes or around 50 photos to a gallery tops. There are some special editions where there are literally 100s of pictures in 20-minute long galleries, and while I appreciate the effort, jeeze. Enough is enough.

Of course, you don't HAVE to watch anything, so by now I usually skip over this type of stuff. But being kind of obsessive-compulsive, it's taken me a long time to get myself to do this. I wonder how much of my life I've spent watching behind-the-scenes photo galleries... :rolleyes:

R Phillips
07-20-2010, 08:32 PM
It is rare these days for me to listen to a commentary or be impressed enough by extras to make a purchase based on them. That being said I've just about busted a nut waiting for Forbidden World and Galaxy Of Terror. :D

Quite true. I saw Galaxy of Terror at a Drive-in. The only way to go.
I haven't seen this film since it was released. I hope it holds up in a cheesy kind of way. Same with Starcrash in September. After I saw that I wanted to propose to Caroline Munro and I was only 15.

Wayne Schmidt
07-20-2010, 10:41 PM
But all I can think of is that if BR didn't exist, would we still be getting cult titles with all the bells and whistles released at the same pace as before (not to discount the great work that companies like Shout and Synapse and Code Red are still putting forth)? There would be more $$ for the studios to put into finding product that hadn't hit the marketplace before instead of throwing all their $$ at marketing a new format.I don't think BR's got anything to do with it, frankly. At least for the big studios they simply slowed down or went to burn-on-demand because they weren't selling enough to be worth their while. Just look at the massive dump-offs at Big Lots, Rite-Aid or whatever. If the catalog stuff was selling they'd be happy to put it out.

The article was excellent, btw.

Marshall Crist
07-20-2010, 11:13 PM
I would like to propose some things to Caroline Munro, and she's only 61!

n.phelge
07-21-2010, 12:14 AM
The article is really not just talking about special features, but also the rise and fall of the niche DVD labels and the effort/cost to license and remaster those cult films. I remember walking through Best Buy in the middle of the last decade and looking through rows of films that I would have previously been happy to see on a nth-generation dub (they had multiple copies of the Guinea Pig box, In a Glass Cage, etc.) now being sold in a chain store. These days, there usually isn't anything out of the mainstream in Best Buy, other than Media Blasters titles.

BrianS
07-21-2010, 10:56 AM
The article is really not just talking about special features, but also the rise and fall of the niche DVD labels and the effort/cost to license and remaster those cult films. I remember walking through Best Buy in the middle of the last decade and looking through rows of films that I would have previously been happy to see on a nth-generation dub (they had multiple copies of the Guinea Pig box, In a Glass Cage, etc.) now being sold in a chain store. These days, there usually isn't anything out of the mainstream in Best Buy, other than Media Blasters titles.

Yeah, that's why I don't shop Best Buy anymore.
Most of my shopping was online anyway, but sometimes I just wanted something immediately, but Best Buy stopped carrying the titles I was looking for.

And you're right...that article was also about the rise/fall of niche labels.... the saddest part of the article.

Werner Von Wallenrod
07-21-2010, 11:27 PM
Most of my shopping was online anyway, but sometimes I just wanted something immediately, but Best Buy stopped carrying the titles I was looking for.

Same here.

It's interesting, a lot of people say, "I don't care about the extras; just the best possible presentation of the film." But what the article talks so much about is how good and important extras can be - essentially documentaries onto themselves.

I wonder how many people would skip over Burden of Dreams if it was an extra on Fitzcarraldo because they don't care about extras, but then feel compelled to pick it up when Criterion released it as a stand-alone film on DVD. Look at the docs like Never Sleep Again or His Name Was Jason - those could've easily been released only as extras in Nightmare/Friday boxed sets. But they're great films in their own right. And, in the case of His Name Was Jason, the extras on disc two were possibly more rich and satisfying than the main movie itself.

I don't know... obviously a lot of extras are complete crapola (like the photo galleries which are just freeze frames of the film, or incompetent director commentaries). But you could say that about movies, too: some are great, like Jaws; and some are completely devoid of value, like Jaws: The Revenge.

But it's really sad to me when people write off "extras" so dismissively. "Who cares about extras?" What about when it's a great documentary in its own right? What about when it's a series of deleted scenes that are actually better than what's in the movie? What about when it's the only surviving footage of a great artist (director/actor/cinematographer/whatever) giving a really insightful, informative interview? Heck, I have a few DVDs in my collection where the extras are better than the film, and the only reason I own it.

I think some of you guys who don't care about extras just need to discover some of the really compelling ones.

Highlighting a small part from the original article:


I recently watched a documentary feature that I worked on about eight years ago, when I worked at Blue Underground, before I left to start Panik House. It's called The Godfathers of Mondo, which was an all new (at the time) documentary about Jacopetti & Prosperi, the filmmakers behind Mondo Cane, Africa Addio and Goodbye Uncle Tom, among others. It was released as an extra feature in the Mondo Cane Collection, which was limited to 10,000 copies
...
I am very proud of the finished documentary (only one of 8 discs in the box set) having watched it for the first time since we screened it at the Egyptian Theater in Los Angeles back in 2003. I would go out on a limb and say that it is better than the majority of Academy Award nominated documentary features from the past eight years, and it's better than several Oscar winners.

Dick Ringeisen
07-21-2010, 11:46 PM
Same here.

It's interesting, a lot of people say, "I don't care about the extras; just the best possible presentation of the film." But what the article talks so much about is how good and important extras can be - essentially documentaries onto themselves.

I wonder how many people would skip over Burden of Dreams if it was an extra on Fitzcarraldo because they don't care about extras, but then feel compelled to pick it up when Criterion released it as a stand-alone film on DVD. Look at the docs like Never Sleep Again or His Name Was Jason - those could've easily been released only as extras in Nightmare/Friday boxed sets. But they're great films in their own right. And, in the case of His Name Was Jason, the extras on disc two were possibly more rich and satisfying than the main movie itself.

I don't know... obviously a lot of extras are complete crapola (like the photo galleries which are just freeze frames of the film, or incompetent director commentaries). But you could say that about movies, too: some are great, like Jaws; and some are completely devoid of value, like Jaws: The Revenge.

But it's really sad to me when people write off "extras" so dismissively. "Who cares about extras?" What about when it's a great documentary in its own right? What about when it's a series of deleted scenes that are actually better than what's in the movie? What about when it's the only surviving footage of a great artist (director/actor/cinematographer/whatever) giving a really insightful, informative interview? Heck, I have a few DVDs in my collection where the extras are better than the film, and the only reason I own it.

I think some of you guys who don't care about extras just need to discover some of the really compelling ones.

Highlighting a small part from the original article:


I don't knwo about that, "Godfathers of Mondo" being Oscar (Not that oscars mean much) material, but I did find it decent.

While I don't outright dismiss documentaries and extras, they don't sell the movie on DVD or BD to me. I am buying it for the movie, anything else on there is just, well, an "Extra".

Some I watch, some I don't. Usually, a winner for me is 20 minutes or so, plus a few extra interviews, of 10 min or so in length. I don't need an entire hour of extras per film. Basically, 20-40min of extras per movie is good enough for me.

The last time I think i paid much attention to extras, was The Strangeness. Ever since I saw it on video, I had to know more about that monster. I think i watched all the interviews on that DVD, and 1 or 2 of the short films.

As long as extras are just that, I don't mind them. Give me 30 min or so, and I'm good. It's easier for me to dedicate 30min or so to extras, than 60+ min.

.

Raleigh B
07-22-2010, 12:21 AM
I used to be one of those Extra-driven DVD buyers, but then again it was mainly through being seriously spoiled through commentaries with people like David F. Friedman, memories with Sam Sherman, classic Making-Of features (The Godfathers of Mondo, The Making of Taxi Driver). Most Major Studio discs I usually skipped thanks to not having but a trailer and waiting for some kind of Special Edition to arrive later on.

Recently, though, with the understanding of how tough it can be getting the Extras together and how time and money consuming they can get (Especially for the Indies that are trying to keep it moving in a tough economy), things have got to a point where if the film is interesting enough, it's not all that important to get anything else but the film as there's usually someone on the Internet hammering away at the keyboard for some website that can fill in some of the blanks about it's production history. With more modern films, I don't need too much except for the film as I would usually see interviews or write-ups by those in the know.

Randy Thomas G
07-22-2010, 04:32 AM
I agree with the article in general but his claims for the Godfathers of Mondo seem overblown. I thought it was a merely adequate documentary that didn't really critique its subject enough or dig beneath the surface. I thought David Gregory's various other docs he did for Blue Underground on Jess Franco's films, etc were much stronger.