PDA

View Full Version : Ozu



Al Edwards
11-18-2002, 03:48 PM
One of the bigest overlooked Japanese filmmakers of the classic period is Ozu, whose style goes on the slow side, but can be a fascinating director when viewed in the right mindframe. Many of his films from the early period are sadly lost and few of his films are on vhs with one on DVD. I've seen a lost and rare film by Ozu about a thief who steals to support for his sick child, but can't remember the name of the film. Is there anyone else who has seen this film besides me? I was Born...But, is my favorite of the three films by Ozu, and definitely like to see more of his work.

Al Edwards
11-22-2002, 04:01 PM
I read over at a thread for a Criterion forum that New Yorker no longer owns the rights to Ozu's films. This makes me wonder of, which companies do own the rights to them?

J Dewey Wallis
11-22-2002, 04:14 PM
I agree it is too bad his films seem to be absolutely scant on DVD, but the same goes for many directors (like Kustrica, for instance)... But, as far as Ozu being "overlooked". Hardly. He is one of the acknowleged masters of Japanese cinema, alongside Kurosawa, Imamura, Oshima, and others. I doubt you could pick up a film book about international cinema without reading praise for his work.

Al Edwards
11-22-2002, 06:25 PM
Originally posted by J Dewey Wallis
I agree it is too bad his films seem to be absolutely scant on DVD, but the same goes for many directors (like Kustrica, for instance)... But, as far as Ozu being "overlooked". Hardly. He is one of the acknowleged masters of Japanese cinema, alongside Kurosawa, Imamura, Oshima, and others. I doubt you could pick up a film book about international cinema without reading praise for his work.


Maybe overlooked is the wrong word, but I think now more underrepresented when it comes to directors in Japanese movies not including Kurosawa.

Al Edwards
09-18-2003, 02:35 AM
The film I saw a while ago about the person who steals to help out his sick child, I found out the title of, which is That Night's Wife. I've seen four of his films now, and the ones I enjoyed were An Autumn Afternoon, and I Was Born But. Need to give Tokyo Story a second viewing.

Denise*G
09-18-2003, 03:17 AM
I don't know if there will be any English subs, but in Japan:

Yasujiro Ozu DVD Box Vol.1
* Number of discs (or other units): 6
* Release Date: 2003/09/25
* Price: 23500 Yen(US$ 200.77)
* Director Yasujiro Ozu
* Description:
2003 marks the 100th anniversary of the great director's birth. The boxed set compiles five of director Yasujiro Ozu's classic films: "Tokyo monogatari (Tokyo Story)" (1953), "Higanbana (Equinox Flower)" (1958), "Ohayo (Good Morning)" (1959), "Akibiyori (Late Autumn)" (1960), and "Sanma no aji (An Autumn Afternoon)" (1962). All five movies have been digitally remastered. The 6-disc set includes a bonus disc containing loads of extras. A booklet(s) included.
* Special Features: teaser(s), trailer(s), interview(s) with Wim Wenders, & more

Yasujiro Ozu DVD Box Vol.2
* Number of discs (or other units): 6
* Release Date: 2003/10/25
* Price: 23500 Yen(US$ 200.77)
* Director Yasujiro Ozu
* Description:
2003 marks the 100th anniversary of the great director's birth. The boxed set compiles five of director Yasujiro Ozu's classic films: "Banshun / Late Spring (1949)," "Bakushu / Early Summer (1951)," "Ochazuke no aji / Flavor of Green Tea Over Rice (1952)," "Soshun / Early Spring (1974)," and "Tokyo boshoku / Tokyo Twilight (1957)."
* Special Features: a documentary, and more

Joshua Houk
01-13-2005, 02:33 AM
Okay, so the movie theater a couple blocks from my house is having a huge Yasujiro Ozu retrospective. Can I get some suggestions from y'all of what to make sure to catch? Unfortunately, I probably won't be able to see all of them... although it couldn't hurt to try. The list:

*+I WAS BORN, BUT... (Yasujiro Ozu, Japan, 1932, 35mm, 91 min)
THERE WAS A FATHER (Yasujiro Ozu, Japan, 1942, 35mm, 88 min)
TOKYO STORY (Yasujiro Ozu, Japan, 1953, 35mm, 135 min)
RECORD OF A TENEMENT GENTLEMAN (Yasujiro Ozu, Japan, 1947, 35mm, 72 min)
TOKYO TWILIGHT (Yasujiro Ozu, 1957, 35mm, 141 min)
*WOMAN OF TOKYO (Yasujiro Ozu, Japan, 1933, 35mm, 47min)
AN AUTUMN AFTERNOON (Yasujiro Ozu, Japan, 1962, 35mm, 115 min)
LATE SPRING (Yasujiro Ozu, Japan, 1949, 35mm, 108 min)
WHAT DID THE LADY FORGET? (Yasujiro Ozu, Japan, 1937, 35mm, 71 min)
*DRAGNET GIRL (Yasujiro Ozu, Japan, 1933, 35mm, 100 min)
*THAT NIGHT'S WIFE (Yasujiro Ozu, Japan, 1930, 35mm, 65 min)
BROTHERS AND SISTERS OF THE TODA FAMILY (Yasujiro Ozu, Japan, 1941, 35mm, 105 min)
EQUINOX FLOWER (Yasujiro Ozu, Japan, 1958, 35mm, 118 min)
FLOATING WEEDS (Yasujiro Ozu, Japan, 1959, 35mm, 119 min)
+OHAYO/GOOD MORNING (Yasujiro Ozu, 1959, 35mm, 93 min)
THE LADY AND THE BEARD (Yasujiro Ozu, Japans, 1931, 35mm, 70 min)
*AN INN AT TOKYO (Yasujiro Ozu, 1934, 35mm, 80 min)
EARLY SPRING (Yasujiro Ozu, Japan, 1956, 35mm, 144 min)
EARLY SUMMER (Yasujiro Ozu, Japan, 1951, 35mm, 124 min)
LATE AUTUMN (Yasujiro Ozu, 1960, 35mm, 129 min)
*A MOTHER SHOULD BE LOVED (Yasujiro Ozu, 1934, 35mm, 71 min)
*TOKYO CHORUS (Yasujiro Ozu, Japan, 1931, 35mm, 90 min)
THE ONLY SON (Yasujiro Ozu, Japan, 1936, 35mm, 87 min)
THE END OF SUMMER (Yasujiro Ozu, 1961, 16mm, 103 min)
THE FLAVOR OF GREEN TEA OVER RICE (Yasujiro Ozu, Japan, 1952, 35mm, 115 min)
*I FLUNKED, BUT... (Yasujiro Ozu, Japan, 35mm, 1930, 64 min)
PASSING FANCY (Yasujiro Ozu, Japan, 1933, 35mm, 103 min)

* = The only screenings of these films have live accompaniment, mostly newly commissioned scores by people about as Japanese as the average resident of Memphis, Tenneesee. One film, Tokyo Chorus, is even noted as having the "world premiere of original score by TBA, performed live by TBA" - not exactly the most encouraging words I've read. Am I wrong for thinking that this is horribly misguided? Not to mention the hefty premium in the ticket price that this entails...

+ = The only screenings of these films have actors reading the subtitles. No joke.

Despite the caveats above, I'm really looking forward to the series. I'll be grateful for any recommendations on what I shouldn't miss.

Al Edwards
01-13-2005, 03:38 PM
Since my last post on this thread, I have now seen 13 of Ozu's films including I Was Born...But, Tokyo Story, Woman of Tokyo, An Autumn Afternoon, Late Spring, Floating Weeds, That Night's Wife, Story of Floating Weeds, An Inn in Tokyo, A Mother Should Be Loved, Early Summer, Walk Cherfully, and Where Now are the Dreams of Youth?. My five Ozu films so far(in order) are An Inn in Tokyo, An Autumn Afternoon, I Was Born...But, Late Spring, and Floating Weeds. There are still many other films by Ozu I like to see.

Paul Casey
01-13-2005, 06:36 PM
I'll second I was Born...But, Tokyo Story, and Late Spring. Those are the only one's I've seen. Of the three, I highly recommend Late Spring. I absolutely loved it. I have to check out the other three in the series.

William R.
01-13-2005, 06:53 PM
LATE SPRING, THE END OF SUMMER, and FLOATING WEEDS are definite musts. I'd kill to see them on the big screen. I'm such a huge fan of this director's output that any film you have the opportunity to see I'd definitely suggest doing so.

I also highly recommend:

AN INN AT TOKYO
TOKYO STORY
I WAS BORN, BUT...
AN AUTUMN AFTERNOON
EARLY SUMMER
TOKYO TWILIGHT